Monday, January 21, 2008

Nine of Spades

Cards fall upon the table
top smooth and surfaced to
allow the card to float
just like it does

the air acts as a cushion
pushing it up because its required
nature does not defy gravity easily
it takes a little tom foolery to make
it seem that apples are no longer falling
bishops move unexpected as it opens up a line for a rook to attack
but how to get it there in one piece
and the pawn that never moves until endgame
the worker bees of military simplification
kill threats to the state, a terrible waste of life
but we need it to maintain order

and what is order? Doing what we agreed to do
even though we never know until we try it
that we have crossed into transgressed into
terrifying circumstances, we would never choose
them but being faced with them makes our heir
stand on their hind legs
as a storm comes over
and blitzes them out

Wagon wheels a turn and grind
the eyes that see past any circumstance
her cryptic looks her eyes her vision
it tastes like outer space
it seems a long time
until sin is given
out in parcels
handed to you
for you to figure out
with what to do

and you work out the problems
of your neighbours
and you understand the plight
of the labourers
you seethe at your loved ones
whom you wish could bait
the hook for one of your
lines but that fails to fly

nine of spades
you have a lot of explaining to do


-

3 comments:

Richard Taylor said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard Taylor said...

Nick - you should develop this site

I have always noticed the intriguing language that gets used by astrologists - o.k. it's often a bit samey but its semi-illogic nature fascinates me.

I had close look at this poem "Nine of Spades" - is it influenced by Astrology? - And other of your work - I think that is refreshing if it is...

Also there is the surrealist, Ashberic, Harlowian (as of Michael Harlow), Smithyman?, Emspson?, (Taylorian?!!) even Manhire influence - I like the double or multiplex meanings "heir" (hair) and "line" (from chess) becomes

"...you seethe at your loved ones
whom you wish could bait
the hook for one of your
lines but that fails to fly..."

I also thought I detected a distant echo of Bob Dylan here, and also, by a strange twist, Ezra Pound:

"The enormous tragedy of the peasant's bent back"

I don't know why that (slightly incongruous) line haunts me - it begins the Pisan Cantos.

And I like this:

"nature does not defy gravity easily
it takes a little tom foolery to
make
it seem that apples are no longer
falling
bishops move unexpected as it opens up a line for a rook to attack
but how to get it there in one piece
and the pawn that never moves until endgame
the worker bees of military simplification
kill threats to the state, a terrible waste of life"

Do you play Chess? I started playing again in the last few years..that ("bishops move unexpected") is called a "discovered attack" BTW!

But in the end the (any) poem "belongs" to the maker - unless we getting into intertextuality which doesn't really mean "influence" per se...

And in total this is a great poem.
Well recalling the heady days of
The Poetry Brats!


BTW - I think you have another Blog? But this has some of your strange poems (I can talk!) and beautiful images.

Also - I found the old video of the first poetry Brats - I hadn't watched it right through for for some years.

It is great - some lapses by us all - did you ever do a book? Titus or Brief might be interested in your work..I'll email or link to Brett and Bill Direen if you haven't "met them.

I know you move in mysterious ways!

Anycase - all the best to you.

Richard

annette said...

Good poem. I like it, and am impressed.